134 species in 2 days

Little Egret hiding like a cartoon Ostrich

Little Egret hiding like a cartoon Ostrich

Mustafa and I went up early this morning – in fact I went up an hour too early as I had forgot the time shifting. My phone and thus the alarm adjusted automatically and I woke up 1 hour to early. Well, I survived.

Little Egret

Little Egret

We headed out 1½ later. The weather was clouded and it was rather windy. This had a huge effect on the birds present. It was very hard to work with the warblers and passerines as they were hiding all the time.

Purple Swamphen - with a broom in its eye

Purple Swamphen – with a broom in its eye

While searching for a Zitting Cisticola we came across our only Purple Swamhpen (ssp. poliocephalus) of the trip. It was foraging across a canal and gave supreme views.

Dark Little Egret

Dark Little Egret

Among good numbers of Little Egrets we found a bird with slightly darker plumage. We checked it for Reef Egret right away but apart for the darker plumage it looks like a normal Little Egret.

Flightshot

Shap Flightshot

Unsharp flightshot

Unsharp flightshot

Again today 4 species of harriers were present in the delta – 2 Pallid Harriers, 1 Hen Harrier, 2 Montague’s Harriers and a lot of Marsh Harriers.

Pallid Harrier

Pallid Harrier – male

Montague's Harrier - male

Montague’s Harrier – male

We found good numbers of fuscus Lesser Black-backed Gulls, a few Mediterrenian Gulls, Amrenian Gulls, Yellow-legged Gulls and Slender-billed Gulls, but no Pallas’ Gulls today.

Slender-billed Gull

Slender-billed Gull

The Spur-winged Lapwings in the delta are having some territorial disputes. So once in a while we witnessed fierce fighting – quite impressive actually.

Spur-winged Lapwing fight

Spur-winged Lapwing fight

Spur-winged Lapwing

Spur-winged Lapwing

We ended the birding with a nice Cyprus Wheatear. Out of the 5 we saw yesterday we were only able to relocate this one individual.

Cyprus Wheatear

Cyprus Wheatear

All in all we say 134 species in 2 days in Göksu.

In my last post I posted a picture of a snake. Thanks to Yoav for asking Dr. Boaz Shacham and to Tobias Schernhammer for identifiying it as a Malpolon monspessulanus, commonly known as the Montpellier snake.

Silas Olofson

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s